Your teeth are important.

Buying an electric toothbrush shouldn't be complicated. I mean, it's a toothbrush, right? How hard can it be? Well, have I got bad news for you. This site dives into consumer feedback and frustrating sales pages to dig out the information you need to find the toothbrush that's right for you.

Don't know where to start? Click here!
  • Toothbrush Spotlight: Philips Sonicare DiamondClean. Bringing the sexy back.

    Toothbrush Spotlight: Philips Sonicare DiamondClean. Bringing the sexy back.

  • The Oral-B Professional Series. Power (toothbrushes) to the people.

    The Oral-B Professional Series. Power (toothbrushes) to the people.

Philips Sonicare

Philips Sonicare

The Philips Sonicare line has been releasing best-selling rechargeable electric toothbrushes for more than a decade. Unsurprisingly, they know what they're doing.
Read More
Oral-B

Oral-B

Oral-B has been selling toothbrushes for more than 50 years. Hopefully it won't take me that long to review their products. Watch this space for future updates.
Read More
Recs and Resources

Recs and Resources

Want to know which of the approximately 18 billion brush heads available fit your toothbrush? Who doesn't. This section (once it's up and running, anyway) should help with all your basic electric toothbrush questions.
Read More
Toothbrush Spotlight

Toothbrush Spotlight

Today's featured brush is the Philips Sonicare DiamondClean. Recommended by dentists and beloved by the sort of people who make "Top 10 Electric Toothbrushes" lists, it's both a functional tool and a fashionable accessory. Still, watch out for that price tag.
Read More

Philips Sonicare 2 Series Plaque Control Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush: A Review

Sonicare 2-Series Plaque ControlThis new entry-level toothbrush from Sonicare is the first feature-free model they’ve released that uses modern snap-on brush head technology. For those of us who remember the hygiene issues with the Sonicare E-series, that’s exciting, but is it enough?

Buy it on Amazon.

Introducing the Sonicare 2 Series Plaque Control

The 2 Series Plaque Control is the spiritual successor to the Sonicare Essence. It includes the Smartimer two-minute run time to ensure your brushing session meets dentist-approved standards, but otherwise that’s it. It doesn’t even feature the popular QuadPacer setting that breaks the two minutes down into thirty second increments, ensuring each quadrant of your mouth gets an equal amount of brushing time. Like its fellow low-budget brushes, this is what can be said for it: it brushes your teeth, it brushes them well, and doesn’t do much more than that.

So, if in terms of modes and settings, it’s almost identical to the Sonicare Essence and the Sonicare Elite Premium Edition (though that has QuadPacer, by the way), what’s the point?

The point — and the 2 Series’s biggest selling feature — is its modern design and snap-on brush head compatibility. The older models, like the Essence and the Elite Premium Edition, feature a screw-on brush head which worked fine from a brushing standpoint but had some drawbacks in practice. Screwing on the brush head often didn’t create a watertight seal. That meant water and other gunk would often build up beneath the brush and create an unpleasant mess for anyone who wasn’t unscrewing and cleaning beneath the brush head on a regular basis. Sonicare’s more modern brushes use a snap-on brush head design that eliminates this risk. The fact the 2 Series uses the snap-on brush head design means the majority of the Sonicare brush heads (such as the ProResults and the DiamondClean) are compatible with it. That’s handy if you’ve got another Sonicare user in the house or if you’re looking to sidestep the extra cleaning needed to keep an older Sonicare Essence fresh and functional.

Things to Consider…

  • Bring the noise

One comment that always seems to crop up when people talk about this product is the noise level. Every electric toothbrush is going to make some noise — there’s a tiny motor vibrating in there, after all — but from customer comments the amount of noise the 2 Series churns out is unusually high.

  • Mind the gap

This isn’t the first time I’ve seen users lamenting the fact the brush head doesn’t sit flush against the brush’s handle. That seems to be a trait shared by all of Sonicare’s more modern brushes. If there’s a small gap between the brush’s color code ring and the handle, don’t stress it. It’s all working as intended.

  • Watch your elbows.

Though it’s a little chunkier than the svelte Sonicare EasyClean, the brush and its charging station are both slim and lightweight. Convenient, sure, in that it takes up little space, but if you’re clumsy or you’ve got a couple of curious cats prowling around, you’re going to want to either be careful or buy a brush with a sturdier stand.

What does everyone else think?

As of right now, it’s holding steady with a 4.3 out of 5 rating at Amazon.com. With more than 1,400 customers reporting in so far, that’s not bad.

Read the customer reviews yourself.

Conclusion

As is always the case, the brush you choose is going to be a reflection of your priorities. That said, both on the basis of budget and functionality, I’d probably chose a slightly more expensive brush — either the EasyClean or the Sonicare HealthyWhite (which comes with a sensitive mode and a hard travel case) — over the 2 Series. As always, whatever you buy, keep your receipts and warranty information, but I’m betting from that increased noise that the higher end brushes are better built.

Buy it on Amazon.

Obligatory note on packaging

If you do decide to buy this product on Amazon.com it’s important to understand what “Amazon Frustration-Free” packaging means. You will receive your Sonicare Essence 5600 in a cardboard Amazon box, with none of the original packaging. This makes it considerably easier to open (and recyclable), but much harder to wrap. If you’re buying this toothbrush as a gift, be sure to select the “Retail” option instead.

Snapshot: Sonicare Elite Premium Edition Toothbrush

311Pv8BHZ-LDespite the name, the Sonicare Elite Premium Edition electric toothbrush is a return to an earlier age of Sonicare brushes. Built on older technology, it gambles that users will care more about a lower sticker price than fancy settings and modern conveniences.

If that all sounds familiar, it should. The Elite Premium Edition, at least at first glance, is virtually identical to the Sonicare Essence I’ve reviewed before.

There’s not much point in conducting a full review, so here’s the short version:

Amazon is offering a two-pack of these brushes for around $75 USD. That price is bound to change, but expect to see this product regularly on sale. That’s a great discount on the usual electric toothbrush sticker shock, but is it worth the effort?

It’s an old model.

I alluded to this earlier, but the brush is old technology. That means an older Ni-MH battery, a bulkier design, and an older brush head model that takes some maintenance to keep clean. Be sure to unscrew the brush head and wash it regularly.

ProResults brush heads and DiamondClean brush heads will not work with this toothbrush model. When you’re buying replacement brush heads, be sure to buy the right kind.

Keeping it simple.

Like the Sonicare Essence, the Sonicare Elite Premium Edition sticks to the basics: it brushes your teeth and it does it well, but it won’t do much else. Like with other Sonicare brushes, it features Quadpacer and Smartimer technology to let you know where and when to stop brushing, and eases you into using an electric toothbrush by gently increasing the power over your first weeks of use.

Unlike the Essence, however, it does have one special flourish. Like many of the newer brushes, it has a second “Massage mode” to stimulate the gums. That’s good to see on a budget brush.

World travelling.

The set includes two travel cases and their chargers are refreshingly compact, but the news isn’t all sunshine and roses. If you’re travelling in Europe, you’ll need a converter: the charger is rated 110/120v.

So, is it worth it?

Ultimately, that’s a question of personal preference. The older E-series brushes have been the workhorses of the Sonicare line for years. However, I like the convenience of the newer brush head design, so unless money was a serious factor my choice for a budget brush would be the Sonicare EasyClean.

Buy it on Amazon.

Still want to know more? Check out my Q&A Cage Match: Sonicare EasyClean vs. Sonicare Essence for a blow-by-blow of Sonicare’s two most popular budget options.

Phillips Sonicare EasyClean Toothbrush: A Review

Sonicare EasyClean review

The EasyClean is the cheapest of the newer models in the Sonicare line. It’s slimmer, sleeker and uses Sonicare’s new, snap-on ProResults brush heads, eliminating some of the older models’ hygiene issues. Otherwise, however, its functions are basic — its built-in two-minute SmartTimer keeps your brushing session on track, while its Quadpacer technology makes sure each of the four quadrants of your mouth receive equal attention.

Yeah, that’s it.

If you’re looking for a reasonably priced sonic toothbrush and don’t care about fancy settings or largely superfluous accessories, then this is the brush for you.

Read More

Oral-B Professional Care SmartSeries 5000: A Review

Oral-B Smart Series 5000
The Oral-B SmartSeries 5000 is a high-end model with the bells and whistles to prove it. Its five cleaning modes are similar to those of its Sonicare competitor, the Sonicare Flexcare R910, but fans of Oral-B’s characteristic oscillating brush heads will find they — and the SmartGuide, a quirky external display to track your brushing time — make all the difference.

 


Read More

Q&A Cage Match: Sonicare EasyClean vs. Sonicare HealthyWhite


Toothbrush Reviews - Sonicare EasyClean Review
Sonicare HealthyWhite (Healthy White) vs Sonicare EasyClean (Easy Clean) comparison
Sonicare EasyClean vs. Sonicare HealthyWhite

… Fight!

Okay, if you were expecting an all-out bloodbath like last time’s Sonicare EasyClean vs Sonicare Essence 5600, I’m sorry to disappoint you. These two brushes are pretty similar, so this week’s electric toothbrush cage match is going to be short and sweet. If you’re Sonicare toothbrush savvy, you probably noticed that there are two Sonicare HealthyWhite brushes on the market right now — the 710 and the 732. You can read my full review of the HealthyWhite 710, but we’ll be talking about the

HealthyWhite 732. It’s the better brush.

Brush Design

 Sonicare EasyClean  Sonicare HealthyWhite
  • new model
  • snap-on brush head design avoids buildup issues
  • compatible with both ProResults brush heads and newly-released DiamondClean brush heads
  • multi-voltage charger, no travel case
  • hygienic travel cap
  • new model
  • snap-on brush head design avoids buildup issues
  • compatible with both ProResults brush heads and newly-released DiamondClean brush heads
  • multi-voltage travel charger and hard travel case
  • hygienic travel cap
  • pretty

Winner:

Okay, so I’ll admit that’s a slim victory. The HealthyWhite features LED displays to indicate battery strength and setting selection. It also sensibly comes with a hard travel case for brushing on the go, a lot more useful than the little hygienic travel cap packaged with the EasyClean.

Settings

Sonicare EasyClean Sonicare HealthyWhite
  • 31,000 movements per minute
  • “Clean” – runs two minutes
  • “easy-start” mode for new users
  • Quadpacer
  • Pause function
  • 31,000 movements per minute
  • “Clean” (runs two minutes), “Clean & White” (whitens teeth), Sensitive
  • “easy-start” mode for new users
  • Quadpacer
  • Pause function

Winner: 

though not for the reasons you’d think. Essentially, “Clean & White” is two minutes of “Clean” with an extra 30 seconds of “White” to focus attention on your front teeth. “White” mode sounds and feels different from “Clean” mode (it’s it’s own setting, not just an extra 30 seconds of “Clean” for show) and Sonicare claims it will whiten your teeth two shades in two weeks, but I’m still a little curious how it works. What really impresses me about this brush is the “Sensitive” setting. If you have sensitive teeth and want a Sonicare brush, this is the cheapest option by far.

Note: “Sensitive” is only available with the HealthyWhite 732 brush. The lower-end model, the 710, only offers “Clean” and “Clean & White.”

Price

 Sonicare EasyClean Sonicare HealthyWhite 
  •  ~$90 (before sales)
  •  ~$120 (before sales)

Winner:

Not a huge shock, here. The EasyClean is a workhorse of a brush — it cleans your teeth and that’s about it. If you don’t want or need a brush that claims to whiten your teeth or caters to your sensitive gums, from a financial perspective, the decision’s obvious. In any event, try to

and save yourself some money. Keep an eye out for coupons in the “Special Offers and Product Promotions” section, too.

Potential Issues

SSonicare EasyClean   Sonicare HealthyWhite
  • Small and light means it’s easily knocked over
  • Old brush heads from earlier generation won’t work
  • Li-Ion batteries are complicated
  • No travel case
  • Small and light means it’s easily knocked over
  • Old brush heads from earlier generation won’t work
  • Li-Ion batteries are complicated
  • “Clean & White” has mixed reviews
  • Difficult to turn it off

Winner: This one’s tough. Like I said before, these two brushes are very similar. Of the two, the EasyClean probably holds up best, but that’s because it has less to do. I’m calling this a tie.

Clarification: Li-Ion batteries have to be treated a certain way to ensure their long-term health and, unfortunately, it’s not intuitive. Check out BatteryUniversity.com for more information.

Clarification #2: The HealthyWhite is considered difficult to turn off because the “On/Off” and the “Setting Selection” button are the same thing. If you decide to turn off  (or pause) your brush mid-use, you’ll have to cycle through the settings until it stops buzzing.

Customer Rating

 SSonicare EasyClean   Sonicare HealthyWhite
 4.6 stars  4.5 stars

Winner: 

 It may seem close, but when you consider that the EasyClean’s hard-earned 4.6 rating is the result of no fewer than 700 customer ratings (compared to the HealthyWhite’s 220 ratings), the number’s all the more impressive.

Drumroll, please…

Winner: … uh.

So here’s the thing. Both these brushes are actually pretty good. There can be no winner in this contest because people are going to pick different brushes based on their own needs and preferences. For most budget-conscious people, the

Sonicare EasyClean will be enough. It cleans well and, well, that’s the point of a toothbrush, right? But if you have specific concerns, like sensitive or stained teeth, the extra $30 for the Sonicare HealthyWhite

is probably worth it.

Personally, I’d take the HealthyWhite.